Sunday, December 23, 2007

BRIEF INDECISION revisited: July 22, 2006


This post is a reprise from the original from this same blog.

As the one year Anniversary of Scott's death came and went, December 20, 2007, a mere
two days ago, it prompted me to re-read some of his blog.
It brought back many memories, reflections, and the utter horror of this entire situation;
Scott's diagnosis, and his eventual death from pancreatic cancer.

There was so much, in the "in between."
The same could be said for "The Aftermath," the time, spaces, places, feelings, people, confusion
between the here and now.

One of Scott's dearest friends, a frequent and eloquent blogger, and a dear, dear friend
to many of us, lost her Mother to cancer, shortly after Scott died. A "double whammy" to be sure.
My family, Scott's family, lost our Mother a mere three weeks after Scott died.
These episodes and events, give one pause.
Cancer--- I'm sick of it. Death, I'm so tired of it interrupting so many peoples lives.
And yet, it is a part of life.

It is almost Christmas Day, a Holiday, a day of worship, joy, reflection, a traditional time of "family,"
for many people.
Whatever your belief system is, whatever you do on this particular day,
at the very least it is filled with feelings and memories-- both of families and friends.
A day of love and connection.

This day, is forever changed and altered.
I wish DZD comfort and peace. I wish franky, the same.
There are too many people to mention, and, this really isn't my blog or forum-
it's my brothers.
But I do wish you all, peace and comfort and joy.
And if Scott were here today, I know he would want to thank all of you
for loving and caring for him so completely, supporting him,
with such gracious selflessness. Me too.

I wish any and all who are struggling, suffering or filled with a sense of loss
or emptiness, any who are fighting for their lives, just as dear Scott did, not so long ago,
the determination to continue to fight and rage. Life is worth it.

There are better times ahead. And even when it doesn't feel like it,
you are not alone, we are not alone--
we have each other to lean on, when we allow it.

My best to all of you,

Sheri

PS I love and miss you Spot.

revisiting Scott's blog.
His post and the comments made, on July 22, 2006.


Do Not Go Gentle — Poetry & Cancer, Life & Death
Some thoughts about pancreatic cancer, pancreatica, metastatic cancer, dying young, untimely death, quality of life, then poetry or "a making, a creation" — & what can be left of it while coping with fear and grief and dumb fate; trying to make a life, with what seems like little left. Family & friends, love & loss. Comments are welcomed and encouraged, though word verification and moderation are required.
Saturday, July 22, 2006
7.22.06, Brief Indecision
Walked into the kitchen, which is still shaded out because of yesterday's heat — and what they say will come today as well, and took a left turn, walked about ten feet to the far wall where I stood facing the sink, coffee maker, coffee grinder, rice maker, dish rack. For a brief moment I thought about what Frank asked me once, or I thought rather the object of his question, at what point when you get up every morning do you think "Ah, fucking cancer"? Today I woke up and it was already woven into my thoughts from the left turn, the ten feet, the facing of the morning machines.

Cancer, cancer, schedule, calendar, how long, tasks, limited range of drugs, more cancer, less calendar . . . for a moment that's all I thought, not consciously but still that's what I woke up with. Then it hit me, "It's simple. Just make coffee. That is clearly the answer to everything." Just like in Home for the Holidays when Holly Hunter and Anne Bancroft are together talking family shit in the kitchen at 3 in the morning, what does mom do? She puts on a pot of coffee. Every morning, then, too, that's got to be the same answer. It's Pascalian, ". . . kneel and move your lips as if you believe. . .", the exact same behaviorist principle. You'd be surprised at how much of life's routine will simply automatically begin its motion, just start to move by itself, once the beans are ground, cold water filled in, and the switch flipped. It all starts. It's all about making coffee.

This is how the terminal psychology seems to work, if I am in any way representative: News from the restaging wasn't really news in the sense it was information I was waiting for but already knew, information I knew would be coming at some point; the only remaining question was precisely "when will it come?" "when does the cancer pick up and start to move again?" Those are the basic stakes, point being that it shouldn't have come as much of a surprise. But the last restaging brought unexpected good news, and so this week, we, I at least, thought "Hey, maybe we'll have one more piece of good news. Just one more."

The pychology: You receive the shittiest news, you absorb and process it, then you begin to live your new life with this knowledge. The infinite amount of time ahead of you, the juggling of projects within the mind indefinitely, the procrastination with little consequence, and simlpy taking every day for granted and people for granted and the concept of "tomorrow" for granted, all of that is wrenched up, turned over or around, and slammed down in some disfigured form. You still have to make use of it, just that now this thing, it is misshapen and unfamiliar almost. Now, the restaging restarts the whole process, but you've been through it once before so that this version is not quite so baffling, the tunnel vision, heavy crushing feeling descending on your skull, the inexplicably loud heartbeat, and the gradually collapsing vision of the whole room around you — all this happens again but not so severely. This time you know it won't beat you, you're not actually worried you'll pass out and wake when head cracks against the exam room white linoleum floor. This time there's more anger than surprise. This time you're faced with how cancer doesn't give two squirts of piss about 8 weeks of rest or healing, it will move on. This is all just to inform you. An expensive way to inform you. You've been playing on your winnings already. One message. Your winnings are about gone. Second message.

Posted by Mr. Jones at 1:56 PM


3 COMMENTS:

lefty said...
FUUUUUUUUUUUUCK!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!.....
there, i said it. did it work? did i shout it loud enough? spot, i'm so sorry i haven't commented in forever. i do try and catch up and read everything a few times a week. stolen moments at work, you know.
i go through every day with thoughts of you, the cancer, the past, the future, history with you, history despite you and then WHAM.......the daydreaming and nightdreaming with thoughts of you front and center or blended with something else going on, end. i am jolted back to the present, your present. this can't be happening to you....i remember there is not a damn thing i can do.
i can't remember not knowing you. i don't think you know how important you are to me. all of these random thoughts are driving me mad. i'm trying to keep my girlfriend upright and focused while i'm so pissed off and sad. this long distance really sucks right now. if i could only go pick up some pho (thanks for that spot) and come over tonight. well, i could come and get you and bring you back here with the central air and we could watch home for the holidays and the ref and laugh so hard at all of the familiar, or familial, moments until rice noodles choke us. my thoughts are so crazy jumbled after that post spot. i love you so much. i think i am encroaching on a larry length post : )
just put your chucks on and come over. i miss you and i think laughter is the only decent medicine there is. you know, you are going to miss mormon, i mean pioneer day here in this fair state (not the state fair-that’s something else). a free day off work to eat your favorite...swine. hot dogs for you who are unfamiliar with the crazy customs of this crazy state. it’s bigger than the 4th and we are home to the 3rd? largest parade in the united states. the people camping out are a sight to be seen.
all of the jones’ family will be gathering at tossing salad’s for steak and farmer’s market vegies and fruit and maybe some swine. we will all be thinking, talking and laughing about you. there will be some massive fireworks and then the grind starts again. there will be no effing (sp?) mr. jones senior though. he’s not ready to witness his offsping having fun, i mean, his offspring living “immorally”. save that for another day.
you are in my every gesture and thought.
your eloquent posts are incredible but today knocked me on my ass. larry had to walk away.
xoxo, lefty
7:15 PM, July 22, 2006

tossing salads said...
scott, just had a nice conversation with julias brother who lives across the street from me. im sitting her with tears in my eyes. i love you and i fucking dont want this happening to you. your restaging wasnt the best news but it wasnt the worst news. i have been blessed to be your sister. i can only thank you for the opportunity to have helped name you, change your diaper, watch you hit home runs, be so fucking smart that it was scary. i knew i would never be able to keep up. what a gift you are. thank you for showing me a different way of thinking, of being. i cant even imagine what knowing what you are facing means. i would like to know that i could be so brave, so thoughtful, so giving. i dont think so much is fair. we so need people like you. to make this world a better place. you have never thought of yourself as better just because of your intelliegence. you have just accepted that some can teach, give you knowledge, just accepting. from one of the most intelligent people on the face of the planet. fuck!!!! please keep fighting, all the way. this doesnt deserve you. we deserve you. i love you. i so want to be as brave as you. my thoughts are always with you. thank you.
8:03 PM, July 22, 2006

Anonymous said...

Mr. Scott Jones
this might come across cold, but it is not meant to be. what you posted today, although i wish your illness never happened, i almost feel relieved to hear you confront it. i think it's good that you are so up front and honest about your feelings. what a privilege it is to be able to share that with you through your blogs. there's a lot of intimacy with all of your posts, but the nature of this one seems especially so. thank you. thank you for keeping everyone in the light when it comes to how you are actually handling all of this. you could've just as easily shut everyone out. i think you're right. although i wish with all my heart that things were different, i'm thankful to hear that you're trying to go through one day at a time (whether it'd be making a cup of coffee or something else), you're still getting up to do so - you're still fighting for every bit of "normal"; even though your post reads a little like a part of you is letting go, facing the horrid truth of the matter - i think it's all strength. i know you're just being truthful...but don't forget, "let the chips fall where they may" can still buy a lot of time if you fight for it. please keep fighting -
10:27 PM, July 22, 2006

Tuesday, December 11, 2007

Professor Scott

Some photos of Mr. Jones,
his family and friends.

video



We miss and love you, Mr. Monkey Man !!

A very kind note from Scott's oncologist.

Dear Scott's Family and Friends,

I am thinking of Scott today, as a year from his passing races up so quickly.
My thoughts are warm and positive about Scott. I remember him very fondly.
I of course feel regrets and frustrations about the horrible thing that cancer is,
and I wish that I could have done better for Scott. I hope you all are holding up ok.
And that you are living fully and with joy, as Scott would want, and as life demands.

My very best to you. My very best to Scott.

Sincerely
Sam Whiting MD



Dear Dr. Whiting,

Thank you for contacting us.
What an unexpected pleasure. We remain, as ever,
so grateful for the loving care you provided Scott.
He felt safe and confident with you and your vast skills-
and for that, and all that you did for him
we are forever grateful.

Our best to you and your family.

Saturday, December 01, 2007

BITS OF GRACE & GRATITUDE





More and more, I am discovering that I am not the only one
whose life Scott touched.
Thank you,  for your kind letters, emails, and for "checking in,"
especially this first Holiday Season of loss.
It means so, so much.
Please feel free to write, comment- whatever.
Somehow, I think your voice and words will find their way
to him.
With love,
Sheri and family
sschapin50@gmail.com
<

posted by: slarry

a guest and sibling of mr. jones

Sunday, November 18, 2007

THE AFTERMATH Holidays without Scott and Mom



AUTUMN, 2007

Saturday, November 10th 2007

I still can’t imagine my life without my brother and Mom being an
every day part of it. I know it is real, as real as it has been,
for the last eleven months. The knot in the pitt of
my stomach is a constant reminder.

It has been almost a year since Scott passed away.
I guess for the most part, I am doing ok; functioning, getting up in the morning
going about, and doing, what appears to be my life.
Yet, there are times when the "two-by-four" feeling and thud, strikes
me with a blow and force, that knocks me down on my
emotional ass. I stay there for a while and think and wonder...
The shock and emptiness of it all. The harsh, tragic realities that happen,
in this thing we call life.

As much as I sit here, stagnating, thinking and wondering,
I already know what they want me to do.
Stand up, shake myself off,
and get on with things; my life. LIVING.
That is what Scott asked of and wished for me,
mere hours before he died.
Not distracting myself from the pain and emptiness I feel-
but how to live and carry on inspite of it.

Scott believed that distraction is an activity that averts
our eyes from seeing what is really happening, all that is REAL.
Yes, I am a grieving sister and daughter, yes, the loss of my brother and mom
will follow me wherever I go.
I won’t distract myself from the pain that surrounds me.
I will follow their lead-
and LIVE.
Enjoy and be grateful, for all that I have.
The family and friends I have been
so richly blessed with.
Grateful for those who love and care for my brother and Mom.

Be grateful for even the mundane.
They were.

loves and hugs.
I, we, all miss you so very much.

love,

Slarry

Saturday, October 20, 2007

WHAT CANCER CANNOT DO / a guest of M. Jones



Several people have asked if I know where they can find the quote:
"WHAT CANCER CANNOT DO."

Here it is. I have a Tee shirt with this quote on it,
though I must admit- "CANCER SUCKS !" remains my favorite.






Cancer is so limited
It cannot cripple love
It cannot shatter hope
It cannot erode faith
It cannot eat away peace
It cannot destroy confidence
It cannot kill friendship
It cannot shut out memories
It cannot silence courage
It cannot invade the soul
It cannot reduce eternal life
It cannot quench the spirit....


--anon.

Hope this helped.
Yes, cancer is painful, horrid, senseless, tragic and
sometimes, terminal.
As dzd said in her guest blog a year ago ( ? )
be grateful for the mundane, the every day things of life.
They are precious, and often overlooked, as "gifts."

Though Pancreatic Cancer killed Scott physically, he lives on
in the hearts of all of those who know and love him.
He lives on through his words, his beautiful mind
and through all of those he inspired.

I miss my brother....

Sheri

Tuesday, October 02, 2007

TINFISH PRESS: "Someday I'll Be Sitting in A Dingy Bar"



"Someday I'll Be Sitting in a Dingy Bar"

Tuesday, Aug 21, 2007
a collection of poems, by Hwang Jiwoo.

Hwang Jiwoo: Author & Poet of:
"Someday I'll Be Sitting in a Dingy Bar"
with Professor Scott H Swaner, one of the co-translators.

This beautiful, yet often hauntingly dark collection of Korean poems
can be purchased at: www.tinfishpress.com.

As Scott's family, and our recently getting to know the great and talented people of TinFish Press, we have grown to admire and value our new kinship with them. More, to appreciate and respect their vision, and the passion and dedication they put into each of their creations.
They are a generous and creative bunch of people, who seem to work endlessly.
They are enthusiastict with each individual book they print, each cover they create. Creating opportunities for new writers, who might otherwise not get heard.

"The Dingy Bar Book" became available for purchase a little over six months, after Scott passed away from Pancreatic Cancer.
Being a part of the translation process, making "The Dingy Bar Book" available for english readerhip, along with co-translator, Young-Jun Lee, was one of Scott's most treasured gifts.

He felt honored to be a part of its creation and to work with and learn from such a gifted poet; the eloquent & brillant Hwang jiwoo.
As one of Scott's sisters, I view "The Dingy Bar Book" as part of Scott's legacy and definition.
His love, appreciation and passion for all things Korean--
most especially, its people and their voices.

---sas

www.tinfishpress.com

Our thanks, to Susan M Schultz, editor, creator and publisher of TinFish Press.

Scott H Swaner



Scott H. Swaner

Dr. Scott H Swaner 1968 ~ 2006.
To our friends and loved ones; Our son, brother, uncle, friend, colleague and loved one, Scott Swaner, died December 20th 2006 in Seattle, Washington of Pancreatic Cancer. He was 38 years old. At the time of his death, Scott was an Assistant Professor of Korean Literature and Poetry at the University of Washington in Seattle. After successfully completing an LDS mission (the church of his youth) in Seoul, Korea, Scott's ongoing love affair with all things Korean began. Quoting his mentor and dear friend, Dr. David McCann of Harvard University, "Scott was the first student ever admitted in the Ph.D. program to study Korean Literature at Harvard University. He was a wonderful student, passionate about literature, the serious study and performance of it, and above all else, its relationship to the lives of the Korean people who made and read it. Scott's essay for Harvard's Library and exhibit of works remains an inspiration and tool for Professors and students alike." Scott was born in Northridge, California January 6th, 1968. He grew up in Castro Valley, California until the family moved to Salt Lake City in 1978. Scott graduated from East High School, where he formed many lifelong friendships. Friends who we as a family honor and remember today. Even in high school, Scott was a devoted writer and lover of learning. It was at East High where Scott also developed his love for music, Vespas, soccer and Southern Utah.
Scott earned his B.A. in English Literature from the University of Utah and his M.A. in Korean Literature from Cornell University in Ithaca, New York. Scott was also a a recipient of a Daesan Foundation Grant for translating Korean Poetry and was also awarded a Fulbright Scholarship. Scott earned his Ph.D. in Modern Korean Literature from Harvard University. Upon graduation, Scott was awarded the position of Assistant Professor of Korean at the University of Washington where he taught for three years.

Scott was first and foremost a teacher and a writer, a lover of words with a gift for translating poetry, teaching and deeply understanding critical theories and had a great passion for philosophy. He had a huge impact on his students and left an indelible mark with his teaching, poetry, essays and thoughts.
We were stunned and grief stricken at his diagnosis of Pancreatic Cancer in March, nine months ago. Scott began a website www.donotgogentle.blogspot.com upon learning of his diagnosis.
In it, he continued to teach and educate others about his experience with the knowledge of a foreshortened life, his symptoms and cutting edge treatments of Pancreatic Cancer.
Our family wishes to thank Dr. Sam Whiting and his staff of the SCCA for their consistent, empathetic and supportive care of Scott throughout his illness. We are forever indebted to Dr. Whiting for the lengths he took in helping prolong Scott's life, allowing him to linger here with us just a little longer.
Pancreatic Cancer is intrusive, invasive, senseless, insipid and in Scott's case, terminal. It robbed us of Scott and has left a huge void in the lives of those he leaves behind and all those who love him. Scott left this world much the same way he entered it; with light and life. He fought and raged against cancer with immense courage and bravery. His strength of mind continually amazed us. He did not "go gentle into that good night" (Dylan Thomas) even until his last hours. With his beautiful mind intact and even more expansive heart, he died surrounded by love.
"NOT ONLY IS ANOTHER WORLD POSSIBLE, HE IS ON HIS WAY. ON A QUIET DAY, ONE CAN STILL HEAR HIS BREATHING." Arundhati Roy

Yes, there is another world, another life and we will always be able to hear his breathing.
We love you Scott. You did more in your 38 years than most do in a lifetime. We are and will forever be grateful to have been blessed with the gift you are and have been in our lives. Love you Infinite Numbers, your family.
Scott is survived by his parents, Dr. Harold and Nadine Swaner, sisters; Sue Swaner (Susan Passino), Sheri Swaner (Stepheni Hutton), Stacey Swaner Moore (Kerry), nephews and nieces, Mike Luna (Whitney), Deborah Luna Swensen (Garth), Matthew Luna, Whitney Moore, Dayne Moore and great nieces Alexandria Swensen and Jasmine Luna, and his constant companions and source of peace, his cats.
Preceded in death by his friend and nephew, Daniel Luna, who passed away almost two years ago suddenly and tragically. The loss of Dan affected Scott and we all continue to morn the loss of him.
This is not goodbye, dear Scott. You will never lose your magic . . . and we promise to take care of our beloved mother.
Special friends: Kim Luu, Gillian Harkins, Frank Chiarella, Ted Mack, Daisy Dailey Scholz and Samuel Straight. Special thanks to Kim, Gillian and Ted, Scott's Seattle family, for your constant love, care and support for Scott.

There will be a memorial service held Saturday, January 6th, at noon at Larkin Mortuary, 260 East South Temple. All friends and family are invited to attend.
There will be another memorial service on Jan. 19th in Seattle, WA. Please consult Scott's family or web site for updated info.
Published in the Salt Lake Tribune on 1/4/2007.
Guest Book • Flowers • Charities


posted:
Tuesday, October 2, 2007
by: Slarry, aka; Sheri Swaner, one of Scott’s sisters
31

Wednesday, September 26, 2007

Mr. Jones Obituary


SCOTT H SWANER

01/06/1968 - 12/20/2006

Scott H. Swaner

Dr. Scott H Swaner 1968 ~ 2006

To our friends and loved ones;

Our son, brother, uncle, friend, colleague and loved one, Scott Swaner, died December 20, 2006 in Seattle, Washington of Pancreatic Cancer. He was 38 years old. At the time of his death, Scott was an Assistant Professor of Korean Literature and Poetry at the University of Washington in Seattle. After successfully completing an LDS mission (the church of his youth) in Seoul, Korea, Scott's ongoing love affair with all things Korean began. Quoting his mentor and dear friend,
Dr. David McCann of Harvard University, "Scott was the first student ever admitted in the Ph.D. program to study Korean Literature at Harvard University. He was a wonderful student, passionate about literature, the serious study and performance of it, and above all else, its relationship to the lives of the Korean people who made and read it. Scott's essay for Harvard's Library and exhibit of works remains an inspiration and tool for Professors and students alike."

Scott was born in Northridge, California January 6, 1968.
He grew up in Castro Valley, California until the family moved to
Salt Lake City in 1978. Scott graduated from East High School,
where he formed many lifelong friendships. Friends who we as a family honor and remember today. Even in high school, Scott was a devoted writer and lover of learning. It was at East High where Scott also developed his love for music, Vespas, soccer and Southern Utah.
Scott earned his B.A. in English Literature from the University of Utah and his M.A. in Korean Literature from Cornell University
in Ithaca, New York. It was there that he was
awarded a Fulbright Scholarship and he earned
his Ph.D. in Modern Korean Literature from Harvard University.
Scott was a recipient of a Daesan Foundation Grant for translating
Korean poetry at Harvard University. He was then awarded the position of Assistant Professor of Korean Literature and Poetry at the University of Washington, Seattle.

Scott was first and foremost, a teacher and a writer, a lover of words with a gift for translating poetry, teaching, and deeply understanding critical theories. He also had great passion for philosophy, politics and the poetic process. He had a great impact on his students and left an indelible mark with his teaching, poetry, essays and thoughts.

We were stunned and grief stricken at his diagnosis of Pancreatic Cancer in March, nine months ago. ( 2006 )
Scott began a website, www.donotgogentle.blogspot.com
upon learning of his diagnosis. In it, he continued to teach and educate others about his experience with the knowledge of a foreshortened life, his symptoms and cutting edge treatments of Pancreatic Cancer.
Our family wishes to thank Dr. Sam Whiting and his staff of the SCCA , Seattle, for their consistent, empathetic and supportive care throughout Scott’s illness. We are forever indebted to Dr. Sam Whiting for the lengths he took in helping prolong Scott's life, allowing him to linger here with us just a little longer.
Pancreatic Cancer is intrusive, invasive, senseless, insipid
and in Scott's case, terminal. It robbed us of Scott and has left a huge void in the lives of those he leaves behind and all those who love him.

Scott left this world much the same way he entered it, with light and life. He fought and raged against cancer with immense courage and bravery. His strength of mind continually amazed us. He did not
"go gentle into that good night" (Dylan Thomas)
even until his last hours. With his beautiful mind intact and even more expansive heart, he died surrounded by love.

"NOT ONLY IS ANOTHER WORLD POSSIBLE,
HE IS ON HIS WAY.
ON A QUIET DAY, ONE CAN STILL HEAR HIS BREATHING."

Arundhati Roy

Yes, there is another world, another life and we will always be able to hear his breathing.
We love you Scott. You did more in your 38 years than most do in a lifetime. We are and will forever be grateful to have been blessed with the gift you are and have been in our lives.
We Love you Infinite Numbers, your family.

Scott is survived by his parents, Dr. Harold and Nadine Swaner, sisters; Sue Swaner (Susan Passino), Sheri Swaner (Stepheni Hutton), Stacey Swaner Moore (Kerry), nephews and nieces, Mike Luna (Whitney), Deborah Luna Swensen (Garth), Matthew Luna, Whitney Moore, Dayne Moore and great nieces Alexandria Swensen and Jasmine Luna, and his constant companions and source of peace, his cats. Preceded in death by his friend and nephew, Daniel Luna, who passed away almost two years ago suddenly and tragically.
The loss of Dan haunted Scott, and we all continue to morn the loss of Dan.

This is not goodbye, dear Scott. You will never lose your magic . . . and we promise to take care of our beloved Mother.
Special friends: Kim Luu, Gillian Harkins, Frank Chiarella, Ted Mack, Daisy Dailey Scholz and Samuel Straight.
Special thanks to Kim, Gillian and Ted, Scott's Seattle family, for your constant love, care and support.

There will be a memorial service held Saturday, January 6th, 2007 at noon at Larkin Mortuary, 260 East South Temple, Salt Lake City, UT.
What would have been Scott’s 39th Birthday.
All friends and family are invited to attend.
There will be second memorial service on January 19th in Seattle, WA. Please consult Scott's family or web site for updated info.
Published in the Salt Lake Tribune on 1/4/2007.
Guest Book • Flowers • Charities



Thank you--
Mr. j

http://www.legacy.com/saltlaketribune/Obituaries.asp?Page=Lifestory&PersonId=85805480

Tuesday, January 02, 2007

Memorial Services

Memorial services for Scott will be held:

SALT LAKE CITY, UT
Saturday, January 6th @ noon
Larkin Mortuary, 260 East South Temple

Please contact Sheri Swaner for further details.

SEATTLE, WA
Friday, January 19th @ 3-5 pm
University of Washington Campus
Smith Room in Suzzallo Library

Please refer to his department website, Asian Languages and Literature, UW
or contact Gillian Harkins for further details.


All friends and family are invited to attend both ceremonies.